What Do Jill Stein’s Supporters Want?

What do Jill Stein’s supporters want, anyway? Some of the disenchanted Bernie refugees (the ones who aren’t overtly racist) appear to have latched onto Stein, and flooded the Internet with “articles” promising that Stein is a viable candidate who can defeat either Hillary, or Trump, or both. A candidate’s supporters often engage in hagiography, but Stein’s…

Continue reading →

The End of Glucksberg?

This post on Balkanization about the future of Glucksberg really is spot-on, and so its connection to Michael H v. Gerald D. Buried within Justice Kennedy’s opinion in Obergefell v. Hodges is what appears to be a repudiation of Washington v. Glucksberg, nominally a case about physician-assisted suicide, but known to posterity as the case telling us how…

Continue reading →

‘Why Are So Many Americans in Prison?’

It could be due to incarceration for nonviolent drug crimes, or to the increasing length of sentences. Professor John Pfaff of Fordham Law School doesn’t think so. TL; DR: So over the course of the ’90s and 2000s, district attorneys just got much more aggressive in how they filed charges. Defendants who they would not…

Continue reading →

Prosecutors Charge the Max Because Congress Allows Them To

The New York Review of Books has a great exchange between law professors, judges, and the father of the late Aaron Swartz, about Judge Jed Rakoff’s piece from last year, “Why Innocent People Plead Guilty.” Another federal judge chimes in to agree, and explain how prosecutors can functionally sentence a defendant without the judge ever…

Continue reading →

Peaceful Protests Are Not a Betrayal

The NYPD and its union needs to stop being so petulant about civilian criticism and take this to heart: Creating a space for peaceful, lawful protests is not what killed Ramos and Liu. It should go without saying that demanding accountability of insular police departments isn’t “insult[ing] your sacrifice!” as the Patrolman’s Benevolent Association hyperbolically…

Continue reading →

More Inconsistencies from Jay in New Interview

Natasha Vargas-Cooper of The Intercept somehow secured an interview with Jay, the most important witness in the Hae Min Lee murder, as chronicled on the podcast Serial. Back in 1999, Jay’s story not only changed between police interviews, but it changed between the first and second trial. It also differed from accounts given by friends of…

Continue reading →

‘Sealioning’ Is a Thing I Learned About

“Sealioning” is a bad-faith “debate”1 technique, popularized by Gamergate, in which a person asks irritating questions under color of innocent inquiry. These questions often take the form of leading questions in the vein of “When did you stop beating your wife?” (Or, as one of the comments to the above-linked article observes, when you’re in Tea…

Continue reading →

The Least Interested Prosecutor in the World

Have you ever seen a prosecutor less interested in doing his job than Bob McCulloch? Prosecutors who work in a grand jury jurisdiction have a unique and powerful weapon. In California, the preliminary hearing—where a court decides whether there was probable cause to support the charges—is contested, meaning a few things. First, because it’s a contested…

Continue reading →

Hanna Rosin Decided to Forgive Stephen Glass — Should You?

Of course, as we know, institutions like the New York and California state bars have not. David Plotz, former Editor in Chief of Slate magazine (and Rosin’s husband) lambasted the California Supreme Court’s decision not to allow Glass entry into the state bar: The Supreme Court spends 35 smug, self-righteous pages finding him morally unfit to…

Continue reading →

‘How Oakland Landlords Fight Rent Control’

This article from East Bay Express chronicles only one story—that of long-time Oakland renter Mark Sherman. Nevertheless, it seems like landlords all over Oakland, where rents are going up as refugees flock from San Francisco’s outrageous rents, would be crazy not to use every arrow in their quiver to try and exempt their tenants from rent…

Continue reading →